LUCIFER - ROSEWOOD

Fox TV

Reviewed by Jose Ruiz

Tom Ellis SDCC 2015.jpg      

     Tom Ellis - Lucifer            Morris Chestnut - Rosewood

 

If anyone wonders why on earth we have decided to review these two television shows together, the answer is simple.  They are the same show!

OK, so there are a few differences, and as they say, ". . . the devil is in the details. . ." Here the devil, (perhaps we should say, the Devil) is played by the ultra charismatic Tom Ellis, who as Lucifer, the Lord of Hell, has gotten a bit bored and decided to take a vacation from it all. He opens a club where hot women and cool studs hang out, and decides to plunge into the world to see what he can do.  That part is different from Rosewood.

In Rosewood, a super charismatic pathologist (named Rosewood) has a private practice, charges tons of money for his services and gets involved with hot women, in spite of the fact that he is very, very ill from a disease that will kill him in about three years and he keeps treating himself just to maintain his expensive life style.  Chestnut also often walks around without a shirt, showing off a well toned physique. That part is very different from Lucifer.

Where the two shows dovetail is in their involvement with law enforcement.  Lucifer meets an attractive policewoman and takes it upon himself to be her partner, assistant, pain in the butt cohort, and even though she resists and protests his involvement, somehow they always manage to work a case and eventually solve it.

Rosewood meets an attractive policewoman and takes it upon himself to be her partner, assistant, pain in the butt cohort, and even though she resists and protests his involvement, somehow they always manage to work a case and eventually solve it.  (didn't we just say that?)

There are little off-shoots that differ here and there, but the bottom line is the same.  You know that this involvement, reluctant though it may be between the men and the women, will eventually lead to the same place where all of these stories go.  Castle eventually connects with Becket, the Mentalist eventually hooked up with his reluctant partner, and as far back as 1985, Cybil Shepherd and Bruce Willis were moonlighting around a relationship trying to flirt with real involvement. 

In these shows, Rosewood's illness sometimes gets in the way of a case and Lucifer is beginning to develop a sense of humanity which gets in the way.  The cast members include Jaina Lee Ortiz as Beaumont Rosewood’s potential love connection, Detective Annalise Villa, who has some real issues about her previous marriage and her late husband.  Rosewood takes an interest in her which is clearly beyond the professional element.

Lauren German as Chloe Decker an LAPD homicide detective solves crimes with Lucifer after he takes an interest in her because she appears immune to his abilities and his sexual magnetism.  Chloe's ex-husband is not a fan of Lucifer mainly because of the close connection to Chloe and their daughter.  

Both shows begin with someone killed or dead, then the detectives begin their investigation only to be met by either Rosewood or Lucifer and once they get involved, the case begins to develop.  Somehow the two men seem to discover elements in the case that the women overlooked.  And even though the women profess that these guys will not influence them any more, it's clear that they will, because in each show the women give the guys "the look" which telegraphs loud and clear that this relationship will definitely have a different development in the future.

So if you like this erstwhile sexual tension, these are the shows for you.  If you like police dramas, forget it because the scripts are so transparent that ten minutes into the show you already know "who done it" and the rest of the thirty five minutes are spent seeing these would-be couples dance around in a flirtatious pas de deux.  Then there's the sixteen minutes or so of commercials, which are louder than the shows and infinitely better produced in terms of lighting and detail although blatantly boring.  In that last detail they come close to mimicking the shows themselves.

If you must, check out Lucifer first and then look at Rosewood.  But if you really want to find out what Lucifer is up to, try Dante's Inferno and for medical thrillers read Robin Cook.  You will find both far more exhilarating than either of these shows which will probably go no more than two seasons if they are lucky.

Watching TV today is like listening to Mick Jagger warn that you " . . . can't get no satisfaction!"

Mick really knew the score, unlike these two would be heroes.

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